2 bài review thấy hay hay về ultraportable laptops và digicam

starnt

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Copy từ NYtimes về, không dịch nổi đâu, các bác sài đỡ nhé,
Bài 1: laptop

A Ream of Features in Computers the Size of a Memo Pad
By THOMAS J. FITZGERALD

Published: May 26, 2005

Most of the attention in notebook computing has been on full-size models, the hefty laptops with 15- or 17-inch screens that can replace desktop units. But a spate of new ultraportable notebooks have also recently emerged, in the category often called subnotebooks or ultralight laptops.

These much smaller notebooks have screens of 12.1 inches or less and are compact enough to use in cramped places like airplanes. They are also light enough, in the range of two to four pounds, to tote for extended periods without much strain.

The new models include features like built-in optical drives with DVD burners, improved battery life, fingerprint readers and new processors. Wi-Fi wireless networking is a standard feature.

For a very small notebook, the Libretto U100 from Toshiba ($2,099; www.toshibadirect.com) lives up to its name, which in Italian means little book. Its screen measures only 7.2 inches diagonally, and its dimensions are trim: 8.27 inches wide, 1.31 inches thick and 6.5 inches deep.

Despite its small footprint, the Libretto comes with significant computing power and features. It has a 1.2-gigahertz Pentium M processor, a 60-gigabyte hard drive, built-in Bluetooth and a fingerprint reader for additional security. The unit is light, at just over two pounds, and it includes a dock with an optical drive that both records and plays DVD's and CD's.

A tradeoff on the Libretto, however, is its small keyboard. The keys are much smaller than normal and close together, which can slow typing significantly. I made many typos while typing quickly in a word processor, and I had to keep looking down at the keys to find my way.

Another tradeoff is the small display. At the device's highest resolution, 1,280 pixels by 768 pixels, I had to move closer to the screen to see what I was typing. But the screen's clarity and brightness are strong, bolstered with an L.E.D. backlight, and the 1,280-by-768 resolution allows much content to fit within view.

On the other end of the size spectrum, the Asus W5A ($1,649; www.asus.com), comes with a 12.1-inch screen, a 1.73-gigahertz Pentium M processor and a full-size keyboard. The device weighs about four pounds, and as with the Libretto, the display is a wide screen using the WXGA standard (for example, compared with conventional screens, you see more columns on a spreadsheet). The W5A has a built-in 1.3-megapixel Web camera and optical drive with a DVD player and CD-RW.

As with a few of the other new models, the W5A includes Intel's new generation of Centrino technology, which brings some speed and graphics enhancements, but no major improvements specifically for ultraportables. It has a white exterior of carbon fiber, and three U.S.B. ports - one in the back and one on each side. But the W5A is somewhat larger and heavier than most units with 12.1-inch screens.

A new model from Sony, expected to be available in early June, is the Vaio T350 (starting at $2,200; www.sonystyle.com). More compact than the W5A but larger than the Libretto, the new Vaio includes a wide screen that measures 10.6 inches diagonally, and a keyboard slightly below full size. It includes a 1.2-gigahertz Pentium M processor, one with lower voltage and less battery drain, and a built-in optical drive that records and plays DVD's and CD's.

The main new feature of the T350 is Internet access through a built-in wireless modem and subscription service from Cingular. Three plans are offered, from $50 to $80 a month, and each enables Internet access from within the Cingular Edge network, a high-speed wireless data service available in the most populated areas of the country. Typical connection speeds are 70 to 135 kilobits a second, and in tests it was easy to use the service. And with an included connectivity program called SmartWi, you can toggle between the Cingular connection, available Wi-Fi networks and Bluetooth-enabled devices within range.

An ultraportable from Sharp, the Actius MP30 ($1,617; www.sharpsystems.com), is compact and includes an Instant Play feature for watching DVD's and listening to audio CD's; when the computer is off, you push a button, insert a disc and movies or music run automatically without starting Windows.

The MP30 has a 10.4-inch screen, a 1.6-gigahertz Transmeta Efficeon processor and a file transfer feature that can be useful if you have more than one computer. It allows you to connect the MP30 to the U.S.B. port of any computer and transfer files to and from the MP30's hard drive as if it were a U.S.B. flash drive - all with the MP30 turned off.

Another consumer-oriented model is the Fujitsu LifeBook P7010 (starting at $1,599 with rebate; www.fujitsu.com), with a bay for adding an optical drive (which can record and play DVD's and CD's) or a second battery. Fujitsu estimates battery life at 7 hours, using power-saving tips like lowering screen brightness, and 10 hours with dual batteries. In my test, with screen brightness at full and two applications running, the built-in battery lasted 4 hours 14 minutes.

The P7010's 10.6-inch screen, a wide screen, has a glossier look, intended to enhance video and digital images. But the technique, included on some other models, gives off more glare around indoor lighting. The P7010 has an optional fingerprint reader, plus various ports and slots including FireWire, PC card, Secure Digital and Compact Flash.

Several of the new ultraportables are aimed at business users. Lenovo, which bought I.B.M.'s PC division, offers a new ultraportable ThinkPad, the X41 (starting at $1,899; www.thinkpad.com). It has a 12.1-inch screen and a large keyboard and is powered with a 1.5-gigahertz processor, giving it more speed than its predecessor, the X40. It includes a fingerprint reader for added security, and a useful disaster-recovery tool that runs on a hidden partition.

The Latitude X1 from Dell (starting at $1,499; www.dell.com) is also aimed at business users. It has a wide screen measuring 12.1 inches diagonally, a magnesium alloy exterior and weighs as little as 2.5 pounds, making the X1 the smallest and lightest Dell notebook ever, according to Dell. It has a good-size keyboard and a 1.1-gigahertz Pentium M processor that Intel calls "ultralow voltage" for less battery drain.

Hewlett-Packard, with its Compaq nc4200 (starting at $1,799; www.hp.com), offers faster processors, ranging from 1.73 to 2.0 gigahertz, and its layout includes dual pointing devices (a touchpad plus a point-stick in the center of the keyboard) and also good port placement with U.S.B. ports along the sides and back. It has a 12.1-inch screen and a large keyboard that I thought was the most comfortable among these three business models (with the most space to rest your palms).

With all the ultraportables, the laws of physics still have not changed, so the smaller you go, the more screen and keyboard space you will need to sacrifice. But if you like things small, the choices are getting larger.
 

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Bài 2 Ca mê za

These Cameras Are Lean but Not Spare
By DAVID POGUE

Published: May 26, 2005
N high tech, compromise is the name of the game. You know: the smaller it is, the more it costs; the earlier you adopt it, the more bugs it has; the shinier it is, the sooner your 2-year-old will drop it into the fish tank.

But this spring, the world's camera companies have shattered one of the longest-running compromises: if you want a camera the size of a credit card, lower your photographic expectations.

Now arriving on store shelves is a new class of digital camera: beautiful, wafer-thin models, so small that your credit card could cover one - at least physically. They take sharp, vivid, high-resolution photos once the realm of much bulkier models.

Take, for example, the Canon PowerShot SD400, Casio Exilim EX-S100, Fujifilm Finepix Z1, Nikon S1, Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T33 and Cyber-shot DSC-T7. (Several other companies have sweet new micromodels, too, but I declared 0.8 inch to be the cutoff thickness.)

All but one have five-megapixel resolution, enough for poster-size prints. Most can capture full-TV-screen videos (640 by 480 pixels), with no arbitrary length limit. And as a final compromise-breaker, these itsy-bitsy cameras have mammoth, 2.0- or 2.5-inch screens, which make showing off your artistry a lot easier.

Now, these cameras aren't completely compromise-free. You can't shrink a camera to the size of a slice of Spam without ditching a few components.

Most lack an optical viewfinder; you frame your photos using the screen. The U.S.B., charging and TV jacks have generally been relegated to a docking stand that you have to remember to pack. You get manual control over ISO (light sensitivity), white balance (color cast) and exposure, but you can't dial up a shutter speed or aperture setting. Zooming is limited to 3X.

THE biggest limitation, though, is battery life. Credit card cams manage 150 to 200 shots a charge. That's usually enough for a day of shooting, but a far cry from the 500 shots you might get from chunkier cameras.

On the other hand, a camera this small means you are more likely to have it with you when photo ops strike. And that, after all, is half the photographic battle.

CANON POWERSHOT SD400 In many ways, Canon's credit card cam comes closest to capturing the character of a classic camera. It's the only contender that requires no dock; its U.S.B. cable connects directly to a Mac or PC. It is the only model with an eyepiece viewfinder (albeit one the size of an amoeba). And only the Canon can automatically rotate and display photos taken with the camera turned vertically.

The SD400 can hide behind a credit card, but at 0.8 inch thick, it's among the chubbier skinnycams; clearly, Canon values photographic competence more than "Gee!" forces.

And sure enough, this camera is always there for you. Huge screen icons confirm that you have turned on the fill flash, the macro mode or the self-timer. The two-shots-a-second burst mode improves your odds at the softball game. And in low light, the autofocus-assist lamp ensures crisp focusing.

The 150-shot battery life is disappointing, and there is no fast-shutter sports mode. Otherwise, though, this is a great little camera, available online for about $330. (These prices are those identified at Shopping.com as the lowest from a reliable vendor.)

CASIO EXILIM EX-S100 If this camera doesn't take your breath away, you must not be breathing. At 3.5 by 2.2 by 0.6 inches, it's the smallest zoom camera in this bunch. It's so silvery and polished, it's almost jewelry.

Photographically, though, this camera brings up the rear. The screen's resolution is so low that you see the grain of the dots. The photo resolution is low, too - only 3.2 megapixels. (Fortunately, the price is also low: $222.)

Movies are limited to quarter-screen resolution (320 by 240 pixels). There is no burst mode and no autofocus assist lamp, and this is the only camera that can't show pictures on a TV. The start-up and shot-to-shot times are usually excellent, but you could drive to the camera store in the time it takes the flash to recover.

Still, as a quick-and-dirty snapshooter, the S100 is a captivating bit of electronics. It has a built-in alarm clock, it doubles as a digital picture frame when in its charging stand, and Casio's Best Shot Scene feature takes the concept of scene presets to a joyous extreme. (My favorite is the Coupling preset that lets you and a friend photograph each other individually, yet appear together in a single shot, thanks to some clever scene blending.) Just don't expect National Geographic-quality photos.

FUJIFILM FINEPIX Z1 The new Z1 ($334) is another head-turner, this time in matte black or silver. And it's deliciously fast: fast to start up (under a second) and fast between shots. Compared with previous years' crops, most of these cameras exhibit very little shutter lag (the maddening focusing delay between pressing the button and capturing the shot), but this camera and the Casio focus almost instantaneously.

The zoom lens on this camera doesn't have to untelescope from the body - one reason it starts up so fast. Instead, the zooming mechanism is cleverly mounted vertically inside the camera; a prism bends the light inside. (The Nikon and Sony cameras employ the same design, which first appeared in Minolta's X series.) A front panel glides open with a satisfying click to reveal the lens and turn on the camera.

The Z1 has some unusual features, too. For example, when shooting, you can summon thumbnails of your last three photos at the left side of the screen, so you can remember which shots you have already snapped.

Unfortunately, this is the only camera with no tripod mount. It has no autofocus lamp or burst mode, either, and it requires XD memory cards - an expensive format. These would be irrelevant quibbles, if this camera's competitors weren't so amazing.

NIKON COOLPIX S1 Nikon's first attempt at a card camera is very nearly a home run. The S1 is sleek and small, with a superb 2.5-inch screen and the best battery of the bunch.

The S1 is on the thick side (0.8 inches). Its full-screen movies are only 15 frames per second, not 30, and shutter lag can be a problem. (Prefocusing by half-pressing the shutter button helps. So does using the continuous-focus mode, which keeps an eye on a moving subject.)

Otherwise, what is great about this $340 camera is just about everything. The burst mode grabs 1.8 shots a second. You can dial up very effective presets for 17 lighting conditions like Fireworks, Night Portrait and Underwater. (Underwater housings are available for the Canon, Nikon and Sony cameras.) The S1 even creates spectacular time-lapse movies.

Above all, the Nikon is No. 1 in photo quality among these cameras. And that, when you think about it, is a very good feature in a camera.

SONY CYBER-SHOT DSC-T33 This sumptuous, sleek slab of silver ($341) is, by volume, the largest camera in this roundup. Its standout feature is the spectacular screen, whose brightness, clarity and refresh speed are so good, you feel as if you're peering through a 2.5-inch window. Instead of washing out in direct sunshine, the screen increases its own brightness by reflecting the light. You can even switch off the backlight, saving battery power.

For a snapshot camera, there's a lot of power here: continuous autofocus, burst mode and manual-focus presets. The captured movies have TV size and smoothness, as long as the more expensive Pro flavor of Sony's Memory Stick Duo memory card is used.

SONY CYBER-SHOT DSC-T7 This camera has the same lens, internal zoom mechanism, sensor and screen as the T33, and yet it's totally different: it is the thinnest zoom camera in the world. (Maybe that's why it costs $428.)

The T7's body is impossibly thin: 0.4 inches thick, front to back. The small sliding lens cover adds 0.2 inches, but even so, this camera evokes gasps wherever it's shown. As a bonus for travelers, you don't have to pack the full-size cradle; a compact one-inch, clip-on adapter offers U.S.B. and TV jacks.

Now, Sony couldn't squeeze both the internal zoom mechanism and the screen into the same 0.4-inch depth, so it had to shift the screen to the right side, where the control buttons usually sit. As a result, you have to operate the buttons with your left thumb. A weird metal tab protrudes on the right edge, so you have somewhere to put your right thumb.

Now, if you zoom in, you can see that the T7's photos are slightly "softer" (less sharp) than, say, the Nikon's, and red-eye makes frequent appearances in flash shots. But the color, saturation and contrast of the photos are terrific. Over all, this is a ridiculously skinny, amazing-looking camera that you would dismiss as a gimmick if it didn't take such good pictures.

WINNER'S CIRCLE Ask yourself deep down: is it more important that people marvel over your camera, or the pictures it takes? If it's the camera - really, it's O.K. to admit it - get the Sony T7. The pictures are excellent, the features are all there, and the camera is so small, you can practically carry it in your wallet.

If the photos are more important, the Nikon S1 and the Canon SD400 are the best performers in all lighting conditions. (You can see sample photos from all six cameras at nytimes.com/circuits.) The Nikon offers a bigger screen, better battery life and slightly richer photos. But owning the slightly smaller Canon means never having to say you're sorry you forgot the docking station.

In any case, these cameras prove that wispiness no longer means settling for mediocre photo quality. If you order one, you'll be pleased from the moment it slips in under your front door.


E-mail: Pogue@nytimes.com
 

starnt

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Bàn phím mới này, mại zdô
- Không in một chữ ký hiệu nào - gõ thật dẻo rồi hãy mua nhé
- Lực ấn khác nhau cho các chữ VD: chữ Z ấn nhẹ hơn chữ F mà vẫn ... ăn tiền
Kỳ quái thế mới vui, mỗi tội hơi đắt



A Keyboard That Lets the Supremely Confident Show Disdain for Qwerty
By ANDREW ZIPERN

Published: May 26, 2005


In the programming world, only the strong survive. But what about the smug? A new product, Das Keyboard, seems to have both in mind. It's a regular 104-key keyboard - except that nothing is printed on the keys.

"It's really for geeks," said Daniel Guermeur, the creator. "They can already touch-type without looking. They feel a little bit superior. The keyboard is a statement."

Mr. Guermeur, a 41-year-old programmer and the chief executive of the Metadot Corporation, an open-source software company in Austin, Tex., has been using a prototype model for two years. His company claims that some users, forced to memorize key positions, can type twice as fast within a few weeks.

Das Keyboard also has one feature not found in most keyboards. Each key is weighted by location to be more or less resistant to touch. For example, it takes less force to make the Z key register than it does the F.

The keyboard is on sale at www.daskeyboard.com for $79.95, and the site makes no bones about the target market: "A keyboard with no inscriptions on the keys was obviously only for a certain type of geek, not just normal ones, only those who are above the pack: the übergeeks."
 

gadget-hunter

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starnt said:
Bàn phím mới này, mại zdô
- Không in một chữ ký hiệu nào - gõ thật dẻo rồi hãy mua nhé
- Lực ấn khác nhau cho các chữ VD: chữ Z ấn nhẹ hơn chữ F mà vẫn ... ăn tiền
Das Keyboard also has one feature not found in most keyboards. Each key is weighted by location to be more or less resistant to touch. For example, it takes less force to make the Z key register than it does the F. "
Chính đặc điểm đặc biệt mỗi chữ có lực nhấn khác nhau là để người sử dụng nhận dạng vị trí của chữ trên bàn phím bằng cảm giác dễ dàng hơn, một đặc điểm hỗ trợ cho sự chính xác khi gõ loại bàn phím không in chữ, ví dụ gõ muốn gõ chữ F, nhưng nhấn nhầm chữ D, thì sẽ có cảm giác lực phản hồi khác, sẽ nhận ra mình gõ sai mà không cần nhìn màn hình. Vì thế, đặc điểm này không hẵn là thêm vào chỉ để "ăn tiền".
 

gadget-hunter

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starnt said:
Bài 2 Ca mê za

These Cameras Are Lean but Not Spare
By DAVID POGUE

Published: May 26, 2005
THE biggest limitation, though, is battery life. Credit card cams manage 150 to 200 shots a charge. [/email]
Camera chụp được 150 đến 200 photos một lần charge, thì không hiểu sao lại có thể nói là pin kém? Camera kích cỡ thường cũng chụp được thế là cùng, mà cứ cho là nhiều hơn, thì máy cho amateur chụp được như thế là quá nhiều rồi, có mấy ai một ngày đi du lịch, chụp ảnh nhiều như thế không? Tối về khách sạn thì cũng phải charge lại một cái chứ nhỉ.
 

starnt

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Bác garget ơi, tớ thì lại nghĩ hơi khác một chút, tớ cho rằng những ngón nào gõ yếu: vd ngón út thì lực ấn không căng như ở ngón trỏ, vậy thì hợp sinh lý hơn thôi, tớ dùng chữ ăn tiền không phải là bán đắt đâu :)

Còn về máy ảnh chụp được 150 kiểu tớ nghĩ cũng đủ rồi, 1 buổi mà bấm 50 kiểu không ít đâu, tuy nhiên so với mấy ông khủng long còi khác thì chừng ấy chỉ không bằng 1/2, ví dụ chú Canon A520 xài 2pin AA 2300mAh được khoảng 300 phát bao ăn LCD (theo steve's digicam) hay em A75 còi nhà tớ 4cục 1500mAh mua từ năm 2001 cũng được 250 phát bao ăn LCD luôn.
 

bun2it

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gõ phím đúng chuẩn thì mọi lực đều như nhau bác ạ, vì một ngón chỉ đam đương tối đa 3-4 phím thôi ! Em gõ VNI riết bây giờ hư tay, chuyển sang gõ English cứng còng!
 

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